The survival of Innocence

“Show me your hands”, teacher screamed. And that stroke of the ruler on Jacob’s hand brought out the redness of his blood on his innocent palm. Jacob’s childhood was on the verge of arrest and tears rolled down his eyes. His thoughts made him forget the ruler-induced pain, because the his heart was feeling an intense pinch of a needle.

The scene before this incident was one of the best times of Jacob’s life. He was scribbling something on his notebook and the child sitting with him was smiling. Jacob drew a plump cartoon with a long, red nose and passed on the sheet to Francis.

“This is me”, Jacob declared to the questioning eyes of Francis. Unlike Jacob, Francis was not good at holding his laughter and he giggled slightly. Teacher observed the sound and Jacob got convicted of a crime which was heinous, as per his teacher.

The teacher roared, “Join a circus if you love being a joker”. This statement echoed in Jacob’s ears while he was walking back to his home. He kicked that rock but its sound did not reach his ears because his mind was preoccupied with more important thoughts. “Is being happy a crime?”, His mind asked his heart and the heart wept. Tears did not coordinate this time and he kept walking.

Francis had lost his grandma a few days back and Jacob drew his own picture to make Francis smile. Child’s heart get beguiled easily. Jacob presented himself as a Joker, and he got punished for this crime. When he reached his home, he went to his grandpa. Mr. Rockford was sitting in his armchair, lost in the tunes of his vintage music collection. Jacob entered his room and placed his hands on  Grandpa’s thighs, giving a child’s innocent glare to his eyes.

“What happened to my prince?”, grandpa asked, caressing Jacob’s hair.

Jacob replied with a question, “Grandpa! Is smiling a crime?”. Jacob explained the incident to his Grandpa.

This is what Mr. Rutherford said, “Being happy is the most difficult job and making other’s happy is the real challenge, man enters this world crying. Crying and sadness come naturally, happiness is the thing which is required. For his special works, God sends his children. you are one such special child. Your purpose is to make world a better place for others, making them happy. If you do not make people happy, then gloom will cover up this world and your purpose of life will not get fulfilled. This is a world where a gauche Stan Laurel and a pomp Oliver Hardy made waves by making fun of themselves. Charlie Chaplin used his underprivileged upbringing as his strength and never complained about anything. Education will make you survive, but such works will make you find the real meaning of life. Improvisation is the way to live life, make the most out of it.”

A silence followed, grandpa continued caressing Jacob’s hair and his mind found peace in his words. He was entering sleep, but had become aware of the purpose of his life.

©4yearoldadult

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37 thoughts on “The survival of Innocence”

  1. A lovely story, beautifully told. The teacher belongs to the Dickensian age, although there may still be some like him around the world. The ruler treatment reminds me so much of my own early schooldays here in the UK. (Not in Victorian times, I must add – although the 1950’s may seem an eternity ago!) I’ve felt that ruler sting a good few times, for offences little more than a word at the wrong time of a brief lapse of attention. I suppose we just accepted it as normal, then. I love your message about smiling and spreading a little happiness. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. My schooling was during the late nineties and such teachers were there at that time. However, times have changed now. Teaching has become an art and I love the way they master it these days. My younger cousins are the lucky ones 😉
      Thanks a lot for your words of appreciation 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I had a feeling you were speaking from experience about the ruler. Teaching nowadays is very much different, as you say. I only retired a few years ago after many years of teaching. To most children now, lessons are a happy experience – despite the dreaded homework! In my school days I also had may slapped legs. I suppose I was just too much of a chatterbox!. Thank you for replying! 🙂

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        1. Creativity always has its root in our experiences. Those who are observant towards small events of life, incorporate those in their work. This particular story has been woven around some of my friends. Its basically an amalgamation of several experiences. The belief during my school days was that a bit of strictness goes a long way in the nurturing of a child. Both the teachers and the students have grown since then and their outlook has changed. Being 23 years of age, I am moving towards becoming a Professor in future and I am pretty sure that I am not going to be the Hitler among my students 😉
          I appreciate your views on my story. Keep reading. Nice to have you on board 🙂

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      1. I would say more than potential, perhaps I should have said; You have a natural gift. Also it would help if I spelled the word ‘hooked’ correctly 🙂

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        1. So sweet of you to say that, I am bad at reacting to such praises 😉
          I had this feeling of natural-gift since long but I was too lazy to act upon it. I kept writing in my diaries and tearing them apart. I began blogging on Nov 22nd this year. I am aware of the areas where I need improvement, I always try to make the most out of my strengths. Nice to meet you

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          1. I’ glad you did create a blog. It’s good to share your writing with the world. We are mostly a friendly writing community here. So you will make lots of new friends who will also love reading you. 🙂

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